Getting a move on

Sometimes you get a good idea, spend months writing it, and suddenly it peters out on you. Awhile back, I was working on something I thought was very good. But it just suddenly didn’t seem like it was there anymore. I hate when that happens, and unfortunately it seems to happen an awful lot to me. I think it’s mostly when I come to the limits of my knowledge — I hate to make certain things up, knowing I’ll have to go back and research something to fix what I screwed up in the first draft.

Yes, I’m lazy. Sue me.

And of course, it’s horrible when you want to write and simply have no idea. Or maybe I mean Idea. You know, something that hits you like a big bang — starting all life as your novel will know it.

But what’s just as bad — if not worse — is getting multiple ideas for novels when you’re concentrating on finishing one. It’s distracting, dangit. Those new ideas may not be the big bang — not the Idea — but I’ve found they can break your concentration as you’re sprinting toward the finish line. Of course, at this point I’m not sure I’m sprinting. I’m mostly just hobbling along, hoping for the best.

On another note, I just finished re-reading Stephen King’s novel, Misery. I’m not sure why, but King’s writing probably inspires me to get back to the keyboard more than any other author. And I write nothing like him. But I love his sense of story, his ability to create characters that seem real, that resonate with the reader long after the tale is told.

Inspiring when you find it, you know?

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One thought on “Getting a move on

  1. Finishing is a problem of mine too. Researching, developing setting, cultivating characters and personality as well as maintaining a lucid plot are areas which I excel in. I seem to break down when transitioning between the second and third acts. I think it has something to do of letting my babies go. Third acts call for resolutions. I feel more at home wrapped in the conflict of the second. It’s something I’m working diligently towards overcoming. As far as Mr. King goes, I wanted to be him when I was 14.

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